Let’s talk UX: the Importance of Returning Feedback

Hello all!  Hope the day’s been well for you!  Today I’ll be speaking a bit on returning feedback from your interfaces.

Alright, so let’s say for example that you were speaking to an individual about something.  You both spoke on a rather interesting topic and you just gave your side on the subject and ask what the individual thinks, expecting an answer.  Yet, this individual simply stares at you blankly.  You ask again.  No response. You ask once more, annoyed.  At this point you may do one of three things:  ask again in a more annoyed tone, begin to think something is wrong with the individual, or become frustrated and leave.

Or, in web interface terms, let’s say you filled out a form and hit submit.  Nothing.  You hit it again.  Nothing.  You proceed to hit it multiple times and look around for some sort of message, but you find nothing.

Both of these are examples of situation in which case you, as the user, received no feedback in return.  

It’s highly important that we understand a key point about ourselves:  We. Need. Answers.  When we interact with others, objects, or user interfaces we expect some sort “return on investment.”  If we speak to others we expect a response, be it friendly or non-friendly.  When we push a door, we expect it to open (or not).  When we click or tap a submit button we expect it to give us some sort of response, whether it be a success message or an error message.  When we do not receive any sort of feedback from what we are interacting with then it is a little disorienting; sometimes even alarming.

What  counts as feedback?  Well, almost every interaction a user does requires feedback.

  •  Hovering over a navigation link or an in-page link and displaying a change in link color
  • Changing the page after clicking on a link
  • Submitting a form after a button is clicked
  • Displaying an error message after wrong information has be inputted
  • Highlighted navigation item while on that specific page after navigating to it

Let’s check out an example of feedback more closely:

googleFeedback

Google’s login page utilizes excellent examples of feedback  techniques when you’ve forgotten or input the wrong password.  If you have forgotten your password or changed it and forgotten, the form will inform you whether or not you have changed your password from the one that was inputted or if the password is wrong.  even more so, the password field itself is highlighted with a red border to pinpoint the area in error.

When feedback is provided through our user interfaces we can be fulfilling three of Nielsen’s 10 Heuristics:  Visibility of System Status, Error Recovery, and Error Prevention.

Visibility of System Status – By giving users adequate feedback from their interaction, users will know what is going on as a result of it and understand the situation at hand.  They may know, for example, whether or not they have used a link on Google before.

Google provides feedback of used links by recoloring them if a user has used before, allowing users to make a quicker decision on following a  past link or referring to a different link.

Google provides feedback of used links by recoloring them if a user has used before, allowing users to make a quicker decision on following a past link or referring to a different link.

Error Recovery – In the event that users have made a mistake, displaying feedback detailing the issue at hand will exponentially aid them in diagnosing and recovering from the error.

dropboxError

Dropbox allows a pop up modal to appear once delete file is hit.  Doing this provides users feedback of “hey, you’re about to delete this” and allow them to proceed or recover accordingly.

Error Prevention – Without any feedback given after an interaction, users may try to interact over and over again, whether it be a digital interface or face to face with an individual.  Actions like these may cause more issues, depending on the user interface or individual.  Providing feedback will guide the user in a general direction as to what his or her next action should be.

Microsoft's email service Outlook provides excellent feedback when an image has been uploaded.  Users can see the image transition from uploading to uploaded.  In addition the image is displayed in a very noticeable way, preventing users from multiple uploads.

Microsoft’s email service Outlook provides excellent feedback when an image has been uploaded. Users can see the image transition from uploading to uploaded. In addition the image is displayed in a very noticeable way, preventing users from multiple uploads.

So when you are designing your user interfaces or simply communicating with someone, remember that providing feedback is extremely vital to users.  Without it, users will almost always feel either lost or frustrated.

Don’t cause users stress!

 

——User First, Designer Second——