Let’s talk UX: the Importance of Returning Feedback

Hello all!  Hope the day’s been well for you!  Today I’ll be speaking a bit on returning feedback from your interfaces.

Alright, so let’s say for example that you were speaking to an individual about something.  You both spoke on a rather interesting topic and you just gave your side on the subject and ask what the individual thinks, expecting an answer.  Yet, this individual simply stares at you blankly.  You ask again.  No response. You ask once more, annoyed.  At this point you may do one of three things:  ask again in a more annoyed tone, begin to think something is wrong with the individual, or become frustrated and leave.

Or, in web interface terms, let’s say you filled out a form and hit submit.  Nothing.  You hit it again.  Nothing.  You proceed to hit it multiple times and look around for some sort of message, but you find nothing.

Both of these are examples of situation in which case you, as the user, received no feedback in return.  

It’s highly important that we understand a key point about ourselves:  We. Need. Answers.  When we interact with others, objects, or user interfaces we expect some sort “return on investment.”  If we speak to others we expect a response, be it friendly or non-friendly.  When we push a door, we expect it to open (or not).  When we click or tap a submit button we expect it to give us some sort of response, whether it be a success message or an error message.  When we do not receive any sort of feedback from what we are interacting with then it is a little disorienting; sometimes even alarming.

What  counts as feedback?  Well, almost every interaction a user does requires feedback.

  •  Hovering over a navigation link or an in-page link and displaying a change in link color
  • Changing the page after clicking on a link
  • Submitting a form after a button is clicked
  • Displaying an error message after wrong information has be inputted
  • Highlighted navigation item while on that specific page after navigating to it

Let’s check out an example of feedback more closely:

googleFeedback

Google’s login page utilizes excellent examples of feedback  techniques when you’ve forgotten or input the wrong password.  If you have forgotten your password or changed it and forgotten, the form will inform you whether or not you have changed your password from the one that was inputted or if the password is wrong.  even more so, the password field itself is highlighted with a red border to pinpoint the area in error.

When feedback is provided through our user interfaces we can be fulfilling three of Nielsen’s 10 Heuristics:  Visibility of System Status, Error Recovery, and Error Prevention.

Visibility of System Status – By giving users adequate feedback from their interaction, users will know what is going on as a result of it and understand the situation at hand.  They may know, for example, whether or not they have used a link on Google before.

Google provides feedback of used links by recoloring them if a user has used before, allowing users to make a quicker decision on following a  past link or referring to a different link.

Google provides feedback of used links by recoloring them if a user has used before, allowing users to make a quicker decision on following a past link or referring to a different link.

Error Recovery – In the event that users have made a mistake, displaying feedback detailing the issue at hand will exponentially aid them in diagnosing and recovering from the error.

dropboxError

Dropbox allows a pop up modal to appear once delete file is hit.  Doing this provides users feedback of “hey, you’re about to delete this” and allow them to proceed or recover accordingly.

Error Prevention – Without any feedback given after an interaction, users may try to interact over and over again, whether it be a digital interface or face to face with an individual.  Actions like these may cause more issues, depending on the user interface or individual.  Providing feedback will guide the user in a general direction as to what his or her next action should be.

Microsoft's email service Outlook provides excellent feedback when an image has been uploaded.  Users can see the image transition from uploading to uploaded.  In addition the image is displayed in a very noticeable way, preventing users from multiple uploads.

Microsoft’s email service Outlook provides excellent feedback when an image has been uploaded. Users can see the image transition from uploading to uploaded. In addition the image is displayed in a very noticeable way, preventing users from multiple uploads.

So when you are designing your user interfaces or simply communicating with someone, remember that providing feedback is extremely vital to users.  Without it, users will almost always feel either lost or frustrated.

Don’t cause users stress!

 

——User First, Designer Second——

Let’s Talk UX: Why Research and Requirements are Important

uxdesign_maindetailHello everyone!  Today I’ll be talking to you all about why gathering research and defining requirements is important.

Alright, so let’s say your team is building an app for a client.  The client asks for two requirements, and leaves the rest to your team.  Now,  your team holds excellent programmers and designers that utilize the latest tools of their trade to come up with ideas of what this app will do and look like.  Your team begins with making sure the basic features asked for by the client are included, then begin adding feature after feature that may help the end user and looks awesome.  As your team builds the product more and more, you all begin to really fall in love with the product.

The end product is a latest-featured aesthetically-pleasing design that does what the client does and more.

Key point on more.

Six months pass and you receive a rather heated email from your client saying the app is performing far below expectations.  He details out that the target demographic does not buy the app.  You investigate into the issue and find that the extra features were far misaligned with what the target audience’s goals were.

This is why research and requirements are important.

You find that if you had done some research into the target audience then a few key features that were tacked on would be avoided like the plague.  You would’ve known why some features were important and why were definitely not.  You would’ve had a direction of where your ideas should go.  Some things that could help your team in understanding why UX Research and requirements are important:

1. The product is not for you, it’s for the user.  Using your “gut” and going with what you think is good are very wrong driving factors in creating a user centered product.  Understanding your users is absolutely fundamental in creating this product.  What do the users prefer?  What type of things drive a user for the topic of this product?  What sort of problems are users having in order for them to want this type of product?  These are all questions you can extract valuable information from and apply to the creation of the product.  

2. The interface is magic, but wandering aimlessly accomplishes nothing.  The requirements are designed to help you define a “road map” to what direction your product design should go.  Without these a designer or programmer is left with creating indiscriminately, meaning there is no set way on where their designs are heading.  These requirements are to help drive your ideas in the direction your users would prefer based on educated conclusions, rather than aimlessly wandering in a direction.  

So next time you and your team are commissioned in doing a product, try to understand your target audience and define a path first.  Don’t throw features at an interface and hope or think something good will come out of it.

 

——User First, Designer Second—— 

 

Color Theory: Check This Out

Hey everyone, check out this post on Color Theory!  

colorTheory

This post really delves into what each color means.  It’s really interesting to see the differences between the warm colors vs the cool colors.  Even further in that, the warm colors themselves or the cool colors themselves each hold a different meaning.

I think this can help you all out if you want to really understand how to fit colors together and how to use them in your designs.  Happy creating!

——User First, Designer Second——

Let’s Talk UI Design: Heuristic 3, User Control and Freedom

Hello there everyone!  Hope the days (or nights) are goin’ well for you!  Today, I’ll be discussing some more in-depth of Jakob Nielsen‘s third UI heuristic, User Control and Freedom.  Again, I’ll be using the example from my Usability Overview post, so if you’re late into the game be sure to check that  out!  The example here will be good ol’ Amazon.com.

Alright, to recap from before:

User control and freedom

Users often choose system functions by mistake and will need a clearly marked “emergency exit” to leave the unwanted state without having to go through an extended dialogue. Support undo and redo.”  

amazonOrder

People make mistakes.  Let them have a way out, or a way to fix things.  For example, displaying information entered before and allow editing before placing an order.

Ok, so I chose Amazon’s order review page as a good design example of this heuristic.  As you see in the above screenshot, you as the user are given the option to make changes to your billing address, payment method, and shipping address.  You are also able to apply here a gift card code or promotional code if you had not done so before.  (Side note:  the placement of the change links are right next to the information the link will affect.  Excellent use of the Gestalt Principle of Closure!)

Alright, so the importance of this heuristic?

Human error.  We as humans will make mistakes, and it puts us to ease to see that there is a way to either fix our error or exit out of it.  When we are doing something like inputting information, sometimes we’ll put info that’s not right.  We will mess up sometimes.  If we do not have a way to back out or to fix our error we will  panic.

Plainly stated:  We don’t like fear.  No, no we don’t.  So as a designer it’s important for you to create that sense of security and “safety net” for users.  Allow them a way out of their mistake, or at least let them be able to fix it.

——User First, Designer Second——